U.S. - E.U. Safe Harbor Framework

We previously issued a briefing on the Court of Justice of the European Union’s (CJEU) ruling that declared all transfers of personal data from the EU to the United States under the U.S.-EU Safe Harbor Framework, including those conducted by vendors or suppliers, immediately invalid.  On 14 October 2015, we presented a webinar on this topic, including a practical discussion of the impact and potential solutions.  Moving forward, companies should evaluate the following frequently asked questions to help mitigate the potential risk of exposure when transferring data internationally.
Continue Reading The Safe Harbor Ruling – FAQs and What Your Business Should Do Now

Recent headlines continue to explore the ramifications of the Court of Justice of the European Union’s ruling declaring the long-standing EU U.S. Safe Harbor framework invalid. The decision will have widespread implications on how global corporations manage the international transfer of data.

Please join Reed Smith on October 14, 2015 at 9:00 a.m. PT |

This post was written by Christopher G. Cwalina, Amy S. Mushahwar, and Frederick Lah.

Google, Inc. agreed to a proposed consent order over charges that it used deceptive tactics and violated its privacy promises to consumers when it launched its social network, Google Buzz. The Agency alleged in its Complaint that Google’s information practices violated Section 5 of the FTC Act.

As background, in February 2010, Google launched Buzz, a social networking service within Gmail, its web-based email product. Google used the information of Gmail users, including first and last name and email contacts, to populate the social network. Gmail users were, in many instances, automatically set up with “followers” (people that followed the user or people that the user followed). According to the FTC’s Complaint, even if a user did not enroll in Buzz, the user’s information was shared in a number of ways (e.g., a user who did not enroll in Buzz could still be followed by other Gmail users who enrolled in Buzz). The FTC also alleges that the setup process for Gmail users who enrolled in Buzz did not adequately communicate that certain previously private information would be shared publicly by default. Further, the FTC alleges that certain personal information of Gmail users was shared without consumers’ permission through Buzz (e.g., some information was searchable on the Internet and could be indexed by Internet search engines).Continue Reading FTC and Google – Proposed Settlement Over “Buzz”