Given the vast challenges California’s sweeping new privacy law, the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), poses for digital marketing, the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) released for public comment a draft of its proposed Compliance Framework for Publishers & Technology Companies (the Framework) on October 22.

“Selling” and CCPA challenges for digital. Those who have been actively preparing for CCPA’s implementation on January 1 know by now that pursuant to section 1798.115(d) of the CCPA, a company that has personal information about a consumer may not onward “sell” (as defined in the CCPA) such information to another party without the consumer (1) having received explicit notice of the sale of the personal information and (2) being given the right to opt out pursuant to section 1798.120. Under the CCPA, even if consumers opt out of having their personal information sold, the information may be shared with third parties acting as “service providers” for limited purposes, but the party disclosing the personal information (that is, the “business”) is very specifically limited in its ability to use any data it received that is deemed “personal information.”

Current information sharing practices. Currently, in the programmatic advertising ecosystem, publishers may pass personal information about visitors to their website to downstream participants (the Downstream Participants) who then may pass such information on to others in the supply chain. These Downstream Participants include providers such as:

  • supply-side platforms (SSPs)
  • demand-side platforms (DSPs)
  • ad exchanges
  • ad networks
  • ad tech platforms
  • data management platforms (DMPs)

Downstream Participants also include the advertiser who ultimately purchases the ad, funds the ecosystem, and, in many cases, expects to have ready and trusted access to information associated with its advertising activity and consumer behavior in response to such advertising.

Continue Reading IAB issues CCPA compliance framework for public comment

The International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) has revised its code of conduct for advertising and marketing (the ICC code) to keep up with the “rapid evolution of technology and technologically-enhanced marketing communications and techniques”.

The revised ICC code considers emerging digital marketing and advertising practices, in order to set a “gold standard for modern rule-making in our digital world”.

The ICC code

The ICC code is a framework for self-regulation, which applies across the global advertising and marketing industry.

The basic principle of the ICC code is that all marketing communication should be “legal, honest, decent and truthful”. Other key principles include respecting human dignity, being transparent, fair competition, social responsibility, making the marketer’s identity apparent, and taking special care where communications are directed at children and teenagers under 18.

What’s new?


Continue Reading ICC updates marketing and advertising code to account for the digital world