On March 31, 2021, the Texas legislature passed House Bill 3746 (HB 3746), an update to the state’s breach notification statute. HB 3746 is expected to be signed into law by the Texas governor and become effective on September 1, 2021. The bill makes two primary changes to Texas’ current breach notification statute.

First, the updated breach notification statute will require the Texas attorney general’s office to begin posting on its website “a listing of the notifications” it receives when a breach affects at least 250 Texas residents. The amended statute does not describe what “listing” must be posted; however, the statute prohibits the posting of “any information that may compromise a [business’] data system’s security,” or anything that includes sensitive personal information or is considered confidential under the law.

Unlike similar posting requirements under the laws of other states (California, Massachusetts, etc.), the Texas law provides for a take-down for what might be considered good behavior. If the business does not notify the Texas AG of an additional data breach within the subsequent twelve months, the online posting for that business is to be taken down. In addition, the Texas statute only contemplates publication of one breach – the most recent one. The one-year time period for the listing restarts when each new listing is posted.
Continue Reading Texas legislature updates state data breach notification law to provide for online posting of certain data breaches

Although regulators seem to think all too often that cybersecurity is an after-thought for internet-connected device manufacturers, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) recognizes that as the Internet of Things (IoT) grows, so do cybersecurity risks. In March 2021, NIST published several key takeaways from a recent workshop that provide helpful guidance for IoT manufacturers so that they can be more pro-active in securing IoT devices.

Continue Reading Recent report signals NIST may publish IoT cybersecurity standards

A new proposed federal rule, “Computer-Security Incident Notification Requirements for Banking Organizations and Their Bank Service Providers,” could impose accelerated notification requirements on banking organizations and their service providers when notification incidents (as defined in the proposed rule) occur.

The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), the Board of Governors of the Federal

Beginning in November 2020, the Department of Defense (DoD) has confirmed that new solicitations will include the new Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification (CMMC). Despite the impact of COVID-19, this confirmation indicates that the DoD is intent upon ensuring the protection of certain critical information and shoring up protection of its critical networks and supply chain.

Background

In light of the growing concern over cybersecurity and the increasing complexity of medical device supply chains, the Medical Device Coordination Group has released updated guidance on cybersecurity for medical devices (the Guidance). The Guidance is intended to supplement the essential requirements listed in Annex I of the Medical Devices Regulations (Regulations 745/2017 and

As the U.S. economy and educational system adapt to work and life at home, it is important to remember that cybersecurity (and related privacy) risks remain and are evolving. Remembering to think through measures that are in place to protect personal information, proprietary information, confidential information, and information needed for ongoing operations can help businesses avoid and mitigate these risks. Appropriate protective measures are specific to changing circumstances, but fortunately, guidance and helpful resources have quickly emerged. We have set forth below some important considerations in assessing administrative, technical, and contractual cybersecurity safeguards in virtual business and educational settings.

New tools bring new vulnerabilities

Many entities whose employees are now working from home for the first time are implementing new, sometimes expensive, tools to help their employees collaborate and maintain business operations. These new tools include videoconferencing, file-sharing, and other communication platforms. Even if the employer does not provide the tools, employees may find and use their own.

There are good reasons for implementing these tools at the business level, including consistent-use practices in the entity’s system, a process for regular software patches and updates, and discounted pricing. When selecting and implementing these tools, or modifying the manner and extent by which these tools will be used, it can be easy to overlook or minimize better practices for use of third-party information technology services: reasonable and appropriate diligence, contractual protections, and ongoing oversight and validation.

In addition, it is important to remember that the cybersecurity posture of many (if not most) online tools can vary widely depending on how the tool is configured, maintained, and used. This means considering whether the right virtual-IT skill set has been engaged and applied, and helping ensure that users have the information they need to make better privacy and data security decisions. Addressing these issues effectively can be especially challenging as work and learning environments change radically.

Continue Reading U.S. cybersecurity – points to remember when business is not as usual

On 19 November 2019, the European Union Agency for Network and Information Security (ENISA) released its report ‘Good practices for security of Internet of Things (IoT)’ (Report), providing a comprehensive analysis of security concerns surrounding IoT, secure Software Development Life Cycle (sSDLC) principles, and setting out best practices. Below, we highlight some of the key points. The Report can be read in full here.

Background

IoT refers to a network of internet-connected devices, ranging from microwaves to phones to smart homes. ENISA is tasked with improving the resilience of Europe’s critical information infrastructure and networks, and the Report focuses on establishing good practices for securing the IoT software development process. As a precursor to the Report, in 2017, ENISA released its study ‘Baseline Security Recommendations for IoT’ (here).
Continue Reading ENISA releases report detailing security guidelines for Internet of Things

Last week (28 November 2019), the European Banking Authority (EBA) released the final version of its report entitled ‘EBA Guidelines on ICT and security risk management’ (the Guidelines) (link here) on the mitigation and management of financial institutions’ (FIs) information and communication technology (ICT) and security risks. We highlight below some of the key takeaways.

Background

The EBA released a previous version of the guidelines back in 2017. The Guidelines will incorporate and repeal the 2017 guidelines once the Guidelines come into force on 30 June 2020. The Guidelines are also intended to be read alongside the guidelines on outsourcing that came into force at the end of September 2019.

The Guidelines aim to harmonise requirements for ICT and security risk management.

Their scope will cover:

  • Credit institutions and investment firms (as defined in the EU Capital Requirements Directive) for all of their activities
  • Payment service providers (subject to the revised Payment Services Directive) for their payment services


Continue Reading The EBA releases its final ‘Guidelines on ICT and security risk management’ report

Over the past several years, legislators from coast to coast have increasingly made data privacy and cybersecurity top priorities. The result has been a spike in the number and stringency of laws that impose proactive and reactive responsibilities – covering, for instance, data security and breach notifications – on companies that collect personal information, whether

In a continued pursuit for cybersecurity compliance, New York Attorney General (AG) Letitia James has sued Dunkin’ Brands, Inc. (franchisor of Dunkin’ Donuts) over two data breaches in 2015 and 2018, accusing the company of mishandling a series of cyberattacks that together compromised more than 320,000 customer accounts.

In the complaint filed last week, AG James alleges that Dunkin’, by failing to notify consumers of the breaches or to take sufficient steps to investigate and safeguard consumer data, violated not only its internal data security procedures but also New York data breach notification and consumer protection laws.

In 2015, Dunkin’ was the target of a series of brute force attacks, in which automated software was used to gain access to accounts by guessing various combinations of usernames and passwords. The lawsuit alleges that despite being notified of these attacks by one of its mobile app developers, Dunkin’ did not notify its customers – in violation of the New York data breach notification law – nor did it conduct any security protocols to prevent future attacks, such as resetting passwords or freezing accounts.

Continue Reading With latest lawsuit, New York attorney general continues to demand cybersecurity compliance